Posts tagged ‘callaway mcgregor’

May 22, 2012

The Hulls

I suppose by now everyone is getting quite tired of the Cases.  In fact, I am tired of chasing my tail looking for information on them, too. But, you guessed it, I found a bit more information on a collateral family.

Recall that Catharine Unknown Case married W. Callaway McGreggor, soon after Joshua Case‘s death[1],[2]. This marriage lasted less than ten years as a marriage is recorded for Callaway W. McGreggor to Sarah Clore, her name actually Close, in Randolph County, on 08 Jun 1843[3]. A record of divorce for Catharine and Callaway has yet to be located. The last land transaction I have located for Catharine and Callaway was in 1841, so the divorce happened sometime between then and 1843. Determining that Sarah’s name was Close not Clore and that she was the widow of Henry Close,  was determined by examining the probate records. On 16 June 1843, John W. Close appeared before the probate court regarding his receipt “from Sarah Close (now Sarah McGreggor) his guardian, the sum of $263.60 in full for his share of his fathers [sic] personal estate, & of William T. Evan‘s estate”[4].  Could this mean that Sarah ‘Unknown’ Close McGreggor was an Evans?  If not, what might her family name be?

Searching for the Will of William T. Evans is a bit tricky as it is noncupative, that is oral. There may be a recording in the will book which answers more of these questions, good thing this film is extended as it looks like I am going back for another look!

Henry Close died intestate and Sarah was appointed administratrix of his estate. More clues to her identity lie in the probate records and in the censuses of 1840 and 1870. On 12 June 1843, Norton H. Close, who was at that time a minor over fourteen years of age, chose John W. Close for his guardian. Previous to this, Sarah had been his guardian as in the same order “the letters of  guardianship heretofore granted to Sarah Close as guardian of Norton H. Close” were revoked[5].” Thus, Henry Close had a son named Norton, presumably, this son was also Sarah’s son.

Could Norton have been named for a close relative? In the 1840 census, a Norton Hull, Joseph H. Orr and Henry Close are enumerated, together on the same page of this census[6].  Norton Hull came to Randolph County, Illinois from Kentucky. He arrived with his brothers, Samuel, Lewis and Thomas,  in “the O’Hara Settlement in 1818”.[7] The Orr’s, Joseph and Thomas, arrived in the same year[8].  In the 1870 census,  Sarah McGregor,69, is enumerated with Sarah Close, 18, and Callaway Close, 21. The Family enumerated above them is that of Henry and Ann Orr. According to “Pike County, Illinois Genealogy Trails”, Ann Orr is the daughter of Reverend Thomas and Mary Smith Hull[9]; Thomas was the son of Samuel Hull and Barthena Norton, which makes him a brother to Norton Hull[10]. Sarah and Callaway McGregor moved to Pike County sometime before 1850, as they are enumerated there in the 1850 Federal Census, wherein Callaway’s occupation is listed as “Doctor”[11].

Finally, back to the Archives of Illinois which has a death certificate listing for Sarah McGregory[12] in Kinderhook, Pike County, Illinois, 6 Mar 1878. She is listed as 77 years old at the time of her death, placing her birth year somewhere near 1801, which is consistent with the 1870 Census. If she were a Hull, then she is of an age to have been a sister.

Why should anyone interested in the Case Family of Randolph, County Illinois care about Sarah Unknown, possibly Hull, Close McGreggor? I mean other than the WTF happened here with the divorces and the relos and aside from the fact that, if she is a Hull, then she has been overlooked in previous listings and publications of the children of Samuel and Barthena Norton Hull. Putting all that aside, remember the guardian of Olive, Independence and Jackson Case? True, it is possible that the guardian, Joseph H. Orr, was a “guardian for hire” that is, he was a trusted, prominent citizen who had sufficient wherewithal to have been appointed guardian and he was appointed only for those reasons. I had begun to believe that this was exactly what had happened. However, seeing this mix of Orr, Hull, McGreggor and Close families makes me wonder if there is more to these connections then I had begun to believe.

Looks like this is going to take a whole lot more work.


[1] “Illinois Statewide Marriage Index, 1763-1900”, n.d. http://www.ilsos.gov/isavital/marriageSearch.do.  “MCGREGGOR, W CALAWAY CASE, CATHARINE 1834-01-09 v. 1 p. 158 MONROE”,

[2] Monroe County, IL, County Clerk, Manuscript/Manuscript on Film, Salt Lake City, Utah : Film number 1006355, Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 197. Marriage records, 1816-1915.

[3]  “Illinois Statewide Marriage Index, 1763-1900”, n.d. http://www.ilsos.gov/isavital/marriageSearch.do.

[4] Randolph County, Illinois. Probate Records 1809-1849. Film number 974986, 1832-1843, Preservation Filming, Salt Lake City, Utah, Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1975.

[5] Randolph County, Illinois. Probate Records 1809-1849. Film number 974986, 1832-1843, Preservation Filming, Salt Lake City, Utah, Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1975.

[6] Ancestry.com. 1830 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.  Images reproduced by FamilySearch. 1830 US Census;  Randolph, Illinois, 138; NARA Series:  M19; Roll Number:  22; Family History Film:  0007647.

[7] E. J. Montague, “A Directory, Business Mirror, and Historical Sketches of Randolph County,” Google Books, http://books.google.com/books?id=dTAptDpexbAC&pg=PA107&dq=norton+hull+randolph+illinois&hl=en&sa=X&ei=yZC6T-_nHabl6QHUm7yCCw&ved=0CEsQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q&f=false (accessed May 21, 2012).

[8]ibid

[9] “Pike County, Illinois Genealogy Trails”, n.d. http://genealogytrails.com/ill/pike/cemakersm-z.html.

[10] “Pike County, Illinois Genealogy Trails”, n.d. http://genealogytrails.com/ill/pike/cemakersa-l.html.

[11] Year: 1850; Census Place:  Township 4 S 6 W Pike Illinois; Roll:  M432_124; Page:  180B; Image:  490. Ancestry.com. 1850 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.

Original data: Seventh Census of the United States, 1850; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M432, 1009 rolls); Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29; National Archives, Washington, D.C.

[12] “Illinois Statewide Death Index.” ILLINOIS STATE ARCHIVES. http://www.ilsos.gov/isavital/deathSearch.do (accessed May 21, 2012).