Posts tagged ‘Case genealogy’

July 4, 2011

Perry Evans’sssss

Stitching together Olive’s family and tracing her descendants as they moved about sometimes involves some twists and turns. For example, Olive had three sons, Shelton Joshua or Joshua Shelton, George and Perry. I can find a marriage only for George, who married Annie Egley. George and Annie had a son Perry. After Annie’s death, George married Addie Ramsey Howes. George, Addie, two of her Howe children, Dollie and Charlie, as well as his son Perry are enumerated in 1920 in Clark County, Missouri. Perry Evans, the elder, cannot be located in Clark County, Missouri after the 1910 census, where he is enumerated living alone. Perry Evans, the younger, George’s son, cannot be found in Clark County, MO, after the 1920 census. He may have moved around a bit, as there is a Perry Evans enumerated in District 5, Alfalfa, Burlington County, Oklahoma in 1930. SSDI has a record for a Perry Evans who died in 1963 in Kansas, whose card was issued in Oklahoma.

Here comes one of the twists, there is a Perry Evans enumerated in 1920 in Buchanan County, Missouri, a resident of St. Joseph’s Hospital No. 2. Although I saw this name pop up on census several times, I didn’t connect him with “my” Perry Evans until later. I disregarded the information, thinking that “my” Perry moved on or died. And yes, I know, that sometimes, in fact, most times, to trace family history, you have to connect the dots, that is, your ancestors probably didn’t behave as expected, nor did they leave nice letters or books or other tomes telling you who was related to whom, how they all came to be in this place or that and what exactly was up with Uncle Terrence being in the home for the last thirty years of his life. Sometimes Usually they specifically leave that part about Uncle Terrence out altogether. So, because he had the right name but was in what I thought was the wrong place, I didn’t pay enough attention to this Perry in Buchanan County.

Then I searched the Missouri Digital Archives for Perry Evans, this time leaving off the county designation of “Clark”. There are four death certificates for men named Perry Evans. One is for the Perry Evans of Buchanan County. He is the only one who was born in Clark County. His birth date is listed as 1860. At first glance, I almost discounted this Perry as his name was given as Perry Evans, Sr. and my brain behaved, in complete twentieth century fashion, at first assuming that this designation may have indicated that this Perry Evans had married and had a son who was named Junior, I knew that “my” Perry had been single in 1910 and likely remained that way, with no children. Yes, I do know that, historically, Senior and Junior designations did not necessarily imply Father and Son, or even a relationship, but was a designation for the Elder and the Younger. But, still I wondered, had I made an incorrect assumption? The death certificate for this Perry listed his status as single, not widowed or divorced, so perhaps not. The names of his mother and father are not on the death certificate, rats! The only connecting information is the name of the informant, Perry Evans, Jr. of Burlington, Oklahoma. Oh, and here is the twist of twists, Perry Evans, Sr. had been living in the St. Joseph’s State hospital No. 2 for over 27 years.

Why was he there? Well, not everyone was in the St. Joseph state Hospital No 2 for insanity. Those who could not cope living alone were often placed there. If we examine a few more facts about Perry and his mother Olive, we might have some clue about why he was there. Of course until his records can be located, if they exist, all of the following is mere theory. Perry was the last of her children. He was born in about 1863, Olive would have been about 40 to 43 years old, depending on the census information she provided, most likely the younger of the two based upon guardianship information from the estate of her father. That is, she couldn’t choose her own guardian as she was not over 14 within six months of her father’s death, in late 1833, so it is more likely she was ten rather than thirteen. Perry probably didn’t have Down’s syndrome, given the time period, those with Down’s syndrome would have had a difficult time living past the age of sixteen or seventeen at the latest, Perry lived to over eighty. He died of broncho-pneumonia due to arteriosclerosis [sic]. There is no mention of dementia as a contributing cause, had he been older than 54-60 when he arrived at the institution, the atherosclerosis might have caused some dementia and been the reason he was admitted to St. Joseph.

There are several lessons to be learned from this case. One general lesson learned is that people may not be where you expect them to be. So, if no records are found in the county in which you expect to find your ancestor, search all counties before presuming that he left the state. Perry couldn’t be identified as the correct person from the census alone, but it was a piece of the puzzle. Lastly, one document may confirm information about more than one person. Perry’s death certificate also confirms that the Perry Evans from SSDI records is likely “my” Perry Evans. The SSDI records have Perry born 14 Feb 1888. My Perry was born in Feb 1888, according to the Federal census of 1900 for Clark County, Missouri. SSDI Perry died in Kansas in 1963 and his Social Security card was issued in Oklahoma. According to Perry Evans, Sr.’s death certificate, my Perry Evans, the son of George Evans, lived in Burlington County, Oklahoma.

April 14, 2011

And the dirt he popped up from, he bought in 1830

Joshua Case has been my idée fixe for some time now. He appears to have “popped up out of the dirt” in Illinois in 1830. Here’s the recap of the findings, to date.
The DNA
Thanks to a generous male who descends from Jackson Case, we know that the Case family who lived in Illinois, Iowa, Missouri and Arkansas belong to the same DNA group as descendants of one of the Case brothers who settled in New England in the early 1600’s and are believed to be sons of William Solomon Case of Aylesham, England. Don’t get excited, they did not arrive on the Mayflower. Some accounts have them arriving on the Dorsett. Three are fairly well known and studied, Thomas, John, and William. Thomas had no children, so he is eliminated as an ancestor. There are two other Case names in the area at the time, Richard and Henry, who may also have been brothers to these three. There is no paper or archival source of which I am acquainted which conclusively links Henry and Richard to Thomas, John and William. However, there is a descendant of a Henry Case (1637-1664) on the Case DNA list, whose DNA matches other descendants of William Solomon Case.
So, does this leave me in the same place as when I started? Not exactly. Though it seems with this family I find more about the families associated with them than about them, I am inching ahead, learning a tiny bit about them and more about the history around them. Inchworm, inchworm, you and your arithmetic will probably go far.
The Will and Probate
Joshua Case created a will before he died in September, 1833. In it, he named his wife, Catharine, and his children, Charlotte, Olive, Independence, and Andrew Jackson. From his will, we learned that he owned land and the specific tract was the W½SE¼ of Section 2, T4S, R8W. The will was witnessed by Luther Simmons and John Crozier, who were brothers-in-law of each other and of the Probate Judge, Samuel G. Thompson. Those three were connected through the Crozier family, Samuel married Mary Ann Crozier, brother of John and sister of Nancy, who married Luther Simmons.
Probate for Joshua lasted at least eleven years, the last entry on the film was in 1844. Joseph Orr was appointed guardian for Olive, Independence, and Andrew Jackson. Charlotte Case chose John C. Crozier. None of the records in the Probate book provide direct or stated information for Catharine’s maiden name. Just tantalizing possibilities, was she related to the Crozier, Simmons or Thompson families?
The Land
The land, the W½ of the SE quarter of Section 2 in Township 4S of Range 8W, of Principal Meridian 3, encompassed 80 acres. According to the bureau of land management, government land office site, this land was originally patented to the legal heirs of William Peach, deceased, in 1825. The Deed Record, Book O, page 368 for of Randolph County, Illinois, lists these heirs as William Peach and his wife Priscilla, Levi Simmons and his wife Lois, William Simmons and his wife Mary, and Charles Darrow and his wife Sally. Joshua Case paid $120 for the land.
The Conclusions
Not a lot of “move ahead” information was found for the Cases. Though thin, the information learned here was valuable. Though some say B-O-R-I-N-G, cough- my kids-cough. Joshua’s name was previously thought to be Jonathan; the will and probate proved his name was Joshua. It also proved that his wife’s name was Catharine, not Susannah as some have speculated. Although no maiden name was discovered for Catharine, directions for search are strongly suggested by the recurring associations with the Simmons, Peach, Crozier, Lindsey, Brown and Thompson families. Andrew Jackson’s first name, “Andrew”, was finally and officially confirmed as such. Until this, his name was always stated as only Jackson on every official record I had examined.
So, does this mean mean that I am in exactly the same place as when I started? Not exactly, though, with this family I often find out more about the families around them and history of where they lived than about them. But I am inching ahead. Inch worm, inch worm, you and your arithmetic you’ll probably go far.

March 7, 2011

Genealogy, n. An account of one’s descent from a man who did not particularly care to trace his own.

I have ancestors who popped up out of the dirt.

They came from nowhere, or Ohio, they had no parents, and they died leaving only the land and their best feather bed to their children, whose names were already known. That is, of course, if they left a will. Provided they didn’t burn the place down when they left, well, at least the courthouse. There are no others around them of their surname and they weren’t kind enough to provide the maiden name of their wife in said will. Neither did they provide the relationship they had to their witnesses to said will.

And this is why I love this stuff!

For example, Joshua Case, left a will in Randolph County, Illinois. Bt-dubs, I’m still having a tough time remembering his name’s not Jonathan as he has been Jonathon for almost ten years. He allowed his wife and children the use of his farm as long as his wife Catharine remained his widow. He willed the land to his only son Jackson. Who knew? He had land! The will was witnessed by John C. Crozier and Luther Simmons. These two were brothers-in-law. Nancy Crozier, sister of John C. Crozier, married Luther Simmons. Almost ten years later, Luther Simmons and Samuel G. Thompson witnessed the will of John C. Crozier, again, brothers-in-law as Samuel G. Thompson married Mary Ann Crozier. Joshua’s will did not appoint a guardian for his children, the court appointed Joseph Orr, however, Charlotte, being over fourteen, chose John C. Crozier.

Was Catharine a Crozier? If she were, then she would have most likely have been a sister to John, Mary Ann and Nancy. Were she their sister, then it stands to reason that Samuel Crozier, their father, would have mentioned her in his will. He did not. Still, she could have been a sister left out because he had already covered her in another way. Possible, but not too likely.

The possibility that she was a Simmons or a Thompson or an Orr remains to be investigated.

February 13, 2011

No, my first name ain’t Jonathan, it’s Joshua, Mr. Caise if you are hasty

Yes, the films arrived, yes one of them was of H-U-G-E value. Before I spill on the information in the film, let’s lay out the background information, in order to understand the significance of what was found.

In genealogy, there is something known as intergenerational proof. This is proof that a given person was the parent of another. It seems so obvious to us all now, I know who my mother and father are, and I can prove it with my birth certificate. But what if that record was destroyed or never existed in the first place? How would I prove that I was their daughter? Intergenerational proof can be easy to find, such as when a will names all the children; it is especially handy if the parent bequeaths to women who are already married and is specific, e.g., “I, Joseph Tallchief, give my best feather bed to my daughter Agatha Andreyovich Tallchief, now the wife of John Anderson”. Because that happens all the time! Yeah, dream on. It is rare when a will is found and it so specific that it names everyone in the decedent’s family and their relationship to the deceased!

Hence intergenerational proof is often built in pieces. Frequently records are found which strongly suggest, but never quite say things flat out. Enough of them can provide evidence that certain people had a relationship which strongly suggests that they were parent and child.
Sometimes, a genealogist is lucky enough to find a “record” of a fact which is very unofficial. For example, the intergenerational proof of Jane Mangum’s connection to John Mangum, the Patriot, was not found in a will, or any other “official” and “recorded” document but in a hand written statement by her nephew, wherein he says that his Aunt Jenny married George Crawford. No official document states this relationship. Itawamba County Marriage Book One has a listing for the marriage of a Jane Mangum to George Crawford in Itawamba county, Mississippi in 1841. The only Mangum family enumerated in the county in 1840 was that of John Mangum. This John Mangum was known to have a daughter named Jane, but somebody had named her as the wife of Jedediah Brown, which was in error. This error had to be toppled before Jane Mangum Crawford could be asserted as his daughter. It looked as though it wouldn’t happen until a hand written document of the family history written by Samuel Newton Adair was found. It states:

“I, Samuel Newton Adair, will write what I know about my mother’s folks. My grandfather’s name was John Mangum … Jeney Mangrum married George Crawford, Gemima Mangrum married Samuel Jefferson Adair, my father. Rebecca Mangrum married Joseph Adair, my father’s cousin.”

Obviously, this was not recorded anywhere and must not have been known to the author of “Jedediah Brown” information. Of course now it is known and all those Jedediah Brown proponents have to stop asserting that. They really do have to stop.

Now, are you ready for what was in the Probate file? Well, if you are ready and have not quit reading this altogether, here goes. Well almost, a little more background is needed.

Until the Probate record was examined, we had circumstantial evidence that a man enumerated as Jonathan Case in the Federal Census of 1830 in Randolph County, Illinois was the father of Charlotte Case, Olive Case, Independence Case and Jackson Case and the husband of Catharine (unknown maiden name) who subsequently married W. Callaway McGregor. As an aside, since we are a family of golfers, some of whom are PGA Golf Professionals, that name gives us a chuckle. What are the odds? Notice how I hedged on how he, Mr. Case, was enumerated? Technically, we only know that the name of the man on the census was written down as Jonathan or what appears to be Jonathan to most of us who have read it. On this same page the families nearby include John H. Crozier, in addition to the Shelton Evans family, the William Peach family and the William, Levi, Jr. and Levi, Sr. Simmons families. In this county and nearby St. Clair and Monroe counties there are other records. There is a marriage record for a Charlotte Case to Spencer Ellsworth, in St. Clair county, a marriage record for Independence Case to Beverly Lindsey, in Randolph County, a marriage record for Catharine Case to W. Callaway McGregor (fore!) in Monroe county. A Charlotte Elsworth married Allen Brown in Lee County, Iowa in 1844. A few years later, there is a census enumeration in District 19, Clark County, MO in 1850, for a Catherine McGregory [sic] born in Indiana. She is living with Charlott [sic] Brown, also born in Indiana, and Charlott’s presumed daughter, Catharine, born in Iowa in 1846. Jackson Case, born about 1830 in Illinois, is in the same household. A few pages over in the same census is a listing for Olive Evans, and family and Independence Lamare and family. There is a marriage record, 9 May 1851, for Olive Case to Washington Evans recorded in Clark County, Missouri. We have no death date for the “Jonathan”, of the 1830 census, and no intergenerational proof that this Jonathan was connected to the aforementioned Cases, no birth date for Jonathan. If he was married to Catherine, perhaps they divorced and he married someone else. There is another Case in St. Clair county, who had a brother named Jonathan, was it he who was enumerated rather than the father of Charlotte, Olive, Independence and Jackson? Can the Probate record help answer these questions?

For most non-genealogists, the record is pretty boring, on 16 October 1833, John H. Crozier (remember him from the census?) presents the will of Joshua Caise. The will was not entered into the record on the same page as this entry from 16 October 1833 and has not yet been located in the Probate Court proceedings.

One year later, on the 6th day of October 1834, John C. Crozier renders the account of Joshua Caise, and is ordered to pay the widows share of one third of the estate to Catherine Caise.

It is therefore ordered by the court that the said John C. Crozier pay out to Catherine Caise the sum of sixty-one dollars & sixty three cents this being the share and portion belonging to the said Catherine of the estate of her deceased husband being the one third part of the nett [sic] proceeds thereof.
It is also ordered that the said John C. Crozier pay over to Charlotte, Olive and Independence, children of the said Joshua Case deceased, or to their guardians, each, the sum of forty one dollars & eight cents, this being their share & proportion of the estate of their deceased father.

We are still missing a child, Jackson, who was about three years old when his father died. One month later, guardianship of the children is set, at least for most of the children.

Monday November 3, 1834 court met agreeable to adjournment
“On motion of Joseph H Orr it is ordered that the said Joseph be appointed guardian of Olive Casse, Independence Casse & Andrew Jackson Casse minors under the age of fourteen years on his entering into bond with good and sufficient security as the law directs.”

Two years later, as Charlotte is over fourteen, she may chose her guardian. In February of 1835, she did so.

“Charlotte Casse a minor over the age of fourteen year chooses John C. Crozier as her guardian, it is therefore ordered that the said John C. Crozier be appointed the guardian of the said Charlotte Casse on his entering into bond with good & sufficient security, as the law directs.”

Charlotte’s birth year was thought to have been 1823, if she was fourteen in 1835, her birth year was 1821 or earlier. Meaning that Catherine and Joshua were married by 1820 – 1821.

What about this excites a genealogist? The first examination of the Probate record confirms that Charlotte, Olive, Independence and Jackson, were siblings. It is official confirmation of Jackson’s first name as Andrew. It narrows the death date of Joshua significantly to sometime before 16 October 1833. Joshua was the first name of the father of Charlotte, Olive, Independence and Andrew Jackson Case, not Jonathan, although he may have been named Joshua Jonathan Case. Joshua Case was married to Catherine, who’s surname is not yet known. Charlotte was likely born in 1821, not 1823. The Independence Case who married Beverly Lindsey was the daughter of Joshua and Catharine. What else is interesting? John C. Crozier was enumerated on the same page as Jonathan Case in 1830, which, in addition to the matching family age pattern of Charlotte, Olive, Independence and Jackson, is more indication that this Jonathan is the same person as Joshua and may point to a closer relationship with John C. Crozier or his wife, Mary “Polly” Lindsay, than neighbor. There may exist a relationship to the Joseph H. Orr, which is deeper than some nice reputable guy who was appointed guardian of his children. Don’t confuse custody and care with guardianship, the latter indicated some money management aspect and may have been separate from custody. Lastly, the James Case living next door to Olive Case Evans and Independence Case Lindsey Lemarr in the 1850 Clark County, Missouri Census was not a previously undiscovered son of Joshua Case of Randolph County, Illinois. James Case’s age was 25 in 1850, which may have placed him in the under 5 category in the 1830 census, Jackson may have been not yet born, or as sometimes happened, an infant who was not enumerated.

Oh, and my apologies for ripping off a Janet Jackson song title.